Current Poetry Books

 

Staff

Editorial Director & Author

Production Editor

Nathaniel Wyllie

Editors

Chris Slaughter

Marketing
Analiza Ash

A Stream Keeps Running

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry

This is an unusual poetry book. The first version was completed in 2013, and three years later, this 47th edited version is the final one. Life and death are embraced in four chapters, much like the four movements in a violin concerto. Con Moto (with Motion), Dolce (Sweetly), Morendo (Dying) and Con Brio (with Spirit). There are poems for family members: children, grandchildren and wife. There are poems in various forms: sonnet, tanka sequence, villanelle, free verse, and haiku style poems. Tempo, accent, pause, repetition, meter and rhyme intersperse with the words, the notes, the stanzas and the music. This book is a tapestry woven from the threads of the beginning of life, with eight grandchildren aged one to nine (one born almost every year) to the near-death ordeal of a fading life. But life is not over yet. It is a prayer, a naked sincerity, a longing, "A Stream Keeps Running."

Do You Hear What I Sing

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

Once upon a time dinosaurs ruled the universe with loud, commanding voices. Now, humans rule the world with even louder cacophony. Today, I think, birds choose to speak softly to balance human clamor on this planet. In this book, the author hides behind these birds to amplify their voices, pride, meditations, thoughts and feelings to silence human noises. The speakers in each poem are these noble birds themselves: seagull, dove, hummingbird, nightingale, canary, woodpecker, cuckoo, vulture, mockingbird, flamingo, peacock, hawk, owl, oven bird, curlew, swan, cardinal and the list goes on, for a total of 51 flying creatures. Every bird is asking you the same question, "Do You Hear What I sing." Can you hear them? This poetry book is for those who are tired of noises and longing to hear some true voices.

A Journey in the Animal Kingdom

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

In this book, the author imagines himself to be these animals to tell their stories. The speakers of every poem are these animals themselves: thoroughbred, pig, sheep, reindeer, sea otter, penguin, clown fish, raccoon, rhino, cheetah, piranha, electric eel, cashmere goat, elk, mink, the list goes on, 38 land and 19 water animals in total. At the end, if you look into their eyes and listen to their avowals, you may start to sympathize with the bullfrog, spider, laughing hyena, scorpion, Asian sheepshead wrasse; admire the pygmy marmoset's Lilliput, the payara's attitude and be alarmed by the puffer fish. The author was awakened by them, maybe you will too.

A Never-Ending Battle

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

Life is a continuous river, we all find a way to paddle and float, we can all still stare at the shining stars in the sky. In an effort to keep up with this uplifting spirit, the author quotes excerpts from the theme poem A Never-Ending Battle: "Not the anguish of injustice, nor the despair of the distracted path," "not the slander and odium from failure, nor the pathos of wounded souls," "can block the sun to shine, wind to blow, and carry us from the darkest night to the morning glow."


"The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision" (Helen Keller). In reality, vision or no, life is full of ups and downs, a never-ending battle.

When Ruby Was Still In My Arms

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

"When Ruby Was Still in My Arms" was written in 2015, knowing she would grow, but not knowing who she would become. "Whatever will be, will be, the future's not ours to see." (Que Sera Sera). "When Ruby Was Still in My Arms" and the poem that was chosen for the back cover “The Best of It Is, There Is No Other Choice" are two totally different styles. In between, there are 53 poems in this book that carry infinite perspectives and various emotions. "A Tale of Two Jails," "Mask," "Is It a Departure or Coming Home," "A Place," "A Concubine".... The author tried to reason them into the finite reality with or without avail. Maybe you will have a better luck? "Truth is within ourselves." (Robert Browning) "And it was at that age....Poetry arrived in search of me" (Pablo Neruda). In any case, let it be, let poetry reach inside to touch us.

I Hear the Ocean Landing

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

The author went to Western Australia to witness his son Gary's IRONMAN race. The tenacity and the chase-to-death inspired him, the onlooker, to long for what was missing in his life. When you read the last two sections (IRONMAN 1 and IRONMAN 2) of this book, you may resonate and encounter your own dream and destiny: "My Dream House," "My Bluebottle Fly," "A True Believer Sees a Complete Circle," "I Hear the Ocean Landing" and "I Draw a Line in the Sand." (You can read the theme poem "I Hear the Ocean Landing" by clicking the following link:                                                                 After reading this poem, you could have a different perspective next time when you see the pounding of the waves onto the shore. You may choose to expand your horizon to see the full circle, the dream house, the line in the sand.......... "Choices are the hinges of destiny." (Edwin Markham) It comes and goes, seagull soars to the heavens, relinquishes no path. "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." (Ralph Waldo Emerson).

The Thunder Was So Mad

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

When you read the theme poem "The Thunder Was so Mad," you may conclude the author was forced to be a poet at the age of 6, when his mother passed away, he just never had a chance to write them until now. Maybe you have been a painter, a musician, writer, artist or a poet all your life, but just have not realized it yet, or made the time to find out. "I found this book of poetry to be so emotional and raw - there was so much more emotions of all kinds. Your writing is so strong in this book. I had visceral reactions to many of the poems, which was good! Uniquely." (A quote from a poet.) If you like the baffling word play of Wallace Stevens, or the bleak dryness and the show-no-emotion style of T.S. Eliot’s poems, “Poetry is an escape from personality.” (Eliot), then this book is not for you. But, if you like the straightforwardness of Robinson Jeffers, Walt Whitman or Edna Vincent Millay, then 50 poems in this book could be a treat for you.

I Found Ruth Tonight

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

In this book, you will find a variety of different forms: ballad, tanka-sequence, tanka prose, cinquain and free verse. The author uses tanka-sequence to write many characters such as: "a composer,” “a pianist and a piano,” "a street artist," "a window washer," "a chef," “an EMT,” “a roofer," “a teacher,” “a subway violinist’s hunger” and etc. In addition, he wrote some nostalgic poems. (You can read his tanka prose “Old Buddy Chang," and a tanka sequence “a pianist and a piano” by clicking on the following link:                   In a way, these poems may belong to the category of “anyone who has the ability to read can understand his poetry.” This was the “philosophy” of Langston Hughes and Ogden Nash, two of the most popular poets. Regardless where they stand in the eyes of established literati, it seems more people read their poems than of any other poets in America.

Collected Triplets

by Livingston Rossmoor

A Book of Poetry

In “Collected Triplets” each poem consists of five triplets and most of the triplets consist of three one-liners, (similar to a haiku). Therefore, each poem can have up to 15 one-liners. The whole book of 94 collected triplets from the author’s previous 8 books of poetry presents over a thousand one-liners for your perusal.  “The power of imagination makes us infinite.”-(John Muir).

Selected Ballads, Villanelles, Couplets,

Tanka Sequences, Cinquains & Triplets

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

“Selected Ballads, Villanelles, Couplets, Tanka Sequences, Cinquains & Triplets” is a selection of the best of each of these poetic styles from the author’s previous 8 books of poetry. These older forms of poetry have been there for centuries. But, fewer and fewer poets are writing in these constricted styles. However, in reality, each of these forms carries their own strength and weakness. It is a challenge to leverage each style (that applies to free verse also), to explore and maximize the power of poetic thoughts. The selections here are the result of this striving.

Selected Sonnets

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

“Selected Sonnets.” Historically, the author wrote 341 sonnets, and only 136 were chosen to be included in the previous 8 poetry books. Out of these 136, only 84 are selected in this book. After finalizing the poem "Tortoise," a Shakespearean sonnet, the author began to ponder, "Is he a Christian, Muslim or a Buddhist? Maybe he is a preacher, imam, rabbi, or a monk. What would be your guess?" As written in T.S. Eliot’s “Journey of the Magi”: “Were we led all that way for Birth or Death?/ I had seen birth and death. But had thought they were different: this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places.”

Selected Poems (2002-2017)

 

by Livingston Rossmoor

 

A Book of Poetry 

“Selected Poems (2002-2017)” is over 340 pages and includes a selection of over 190 poems from the author’s previous 8 books of poetry.  In the past 15 years, Livingston Rossmoor has written over 800 poems in 10 different poetic styles, and the best poems have been collected in this one volume.

Heart's Thread

by Livingston Rossmoor

A book of poetry

A thread lingering on......

 

Heart’s Thread is a 1,162 line poem consisting of 166 rhyme royal stanzas, a rhyming stanza form introduced to English poetry by Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400). Chaucer is commonly known as the “Father of English Literature.” He invented this 7 line ababbcc rhyme royal stanza which he used to write parts of “The Canterbury Tales” in the 14th century. This ancient rhyme royal scheme forms the back drop for the tale of “Heart’s Thread.” 

 

Every life is distinct, every journey is unique. This one is no different. Through ups and downs, illnesses and recoveries, defeats and triumphs; unfold before you in the style of an autobiographical book-length poem.

 

One life, the never-ending journey of one soul, a fulfillment of a childhood dream:

 

finding his mother, like the baby elephant, Dumbo.

Everything in Between

 

by Jerry Ball

 

A Book of Haiku

A Second Look

 

by Jerry Ball

 

A Book of Poetry

  • w-facebook
  • Twitter Clean
  • w-youtube

© 2015 by EGW Publishing, Inc. Proudly created with Wix.com